WE NEED YOU  

 

Help find endangered whales around Australia.

We need citizen scientists to assist us find new populations of endangered whales.

We will teach you how to identify the calls of different whale species.

Join us online, to eavesdrop on singing whales, this will help us monitor the return of this endangered animals.

 

We need you, anyone can join in, and you can do it anytime, and all online.

WHALE FINDER

WE NEED YOUR HELP

We have over 1 million images of ocean sound, some with images of whale calls, and others with no animals at all.  We need to know if there is a whale, and if so, which type of whale is in each clip.  We need your help, by sharing the load we can get through the images faster – that’s the power of citizen science.

GET STARTED HERE

CLASSIFY WHALE CALLS

WHAT WE ARE TRYING TO ACHIEVE

Fortunately today we can enjoy the return of marine mammals that had once come dangerously close to extinction. However, while some species are recovering and repopulating previously inhabited areas, others are still vulnerable or endangered

When most people think of migrating whales, humpback whales usually come to mind.  Humpbacks are like the showy cousin to other whale species.  Where the humpbacks throw themselves from the water in acrobatic aerial displays, to the delight of camera wielding tourists, the blue, fin and sei whales slip quietly past, unnoticed. We have just discovered two new populations of blue whales migrating past Sydney.

HOW WE DO THIS

Well, whales sing, each species a different type of song. By eavesdropping, or listening to ocean noise, we monitor for their calls, and this is completely rewriting our understanding of their population recovery.

The images are made from clips of sound recorded at underwater listening stations around Australia and across the globe.  At some sites we have recordings that stretch back 16 years.

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